Legal Matters. Hermès vs. Ebay…and the Winner Is…

June 5, 2008 • Fashion


Are you sure that Birkin you got on Ebay is the real deal? According to WWD, Hermès International scored a major court victory Wednesday against eBay for selling counterfeit luxury goods.

said eBay, plus the individual seller, had "committed acts of
counterfeit" and "prejudice" against it by failing to monitor the
authenticity of goods being sold on its Web site. The vendor, referred to as Madame C. F., eBay France and eBay International are the entities named in the case.

In a verdict
billed as a first in France, it is understood eBay was ordered to pay
$31,058. Hermès said the win marks "an important step in the fight against counterfeiting."

said it takes counterfeiting seriously and since the Hermès case was
brought has put new procedures in place to fight it by more closely
scrutinizing sellers.

Europe’s luxury brands are becoming increasingly vigilant in the fight against fakes.
Since the introduction of new laws in October, a legal framework exists in France against copyright and trademark infringements. Now if only we had that here!

Source: WWD

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2 Responses to Legal Matters. Hermès vs. Ebay…and the Winner Is…

  1. alison says:

    i always wondered how people get away with selling fakes online. it’s good that ebay is taking charge of the situation – a big company like that has the responsibility to set precedence.
    xo alison

  2. Kate says:

    Um, we do have laws against copyright and trademark infringement in the U.S., there is no need to wish for them. That’s why the Prada folks are able to go after the folks that sell fake Prada bags on eBay.
    What we don’t have (thank God) are the stupid “fashion copyright” laws that they have in France and some other European countries. That’s WHY it will soon be possible to buy versions of that studded belt JSP wore in “Sex and the City.”
    No one who truly believes in fashion as a form of self-expression for the wearer would be in support of the “fashion copyright” laws currently being considered by Congress.

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