Today’s Fashion Headlines: Friday April 5, 2013

April 5, 2013 • Beauty, Fashion Blog

image

Bond no. 9 to Launch “Digital Fragrance”

Bond No. 9 New York is hoping to appeal to the tech-savvy with its first “digital fragrance,” which doubles as a three-dimensional QR code. Bond No. 9 founder and owner Laurice Rahme said, “We wanted to really capture what is going on in the world. Everybody is online. Everybody is mobile. So we have to do a fragrance for that world. It’s a different world.”

Aptly named HTTP://WWW.BONDNO9.COM, the scent, which launches June 30, features an enlarged royal blue QR code on the electric yellow bottle, which customers can snap with their smartphones to purchase on the Bond No. 9 site. The code works through ads, in person or via the storied Bondmobile, which will be covered in the design. “It’s not a department store, It’s not Sephora. It’s beyond that. It’s the most direct way to buy that you could ever have.”

The $250 scent, Rahme said, is meant to capture the essence of the world’s “largest village,” the Internet.

According to Rahme, the idea for a digital scent came to her once Bond began adapting QR codes into its advertisements about a year and a half ago. “When I saw it, I said this QR thing is genius, I have to do a bottle like this,” she said.

Because HTTP will have no in-store presence and will be available only virtually, the fragrance had to have universal appeal. For the task, Rahme brought on board master perfumer Michel Almairac of Robertet to imagine a unisex blend of “contemporary tropical” fruits. “To get the scent right was difficult; it’s what I call universal, and that’s not easy to do,” said Rahme, adding that internal studies concluded there are more men than women shopping online. “It couldn’t be too feminine or too masculine. It had to be something everybody likes. It had to be young. That’s for sure. It’s not for your grandmother, we know that. She would never get an app.”

The result is a “fresh, fruity, woody” blend of bergamot, pineapple and juniper berry top notes, a heart of apple, blackcurrant and cedarwood and a base of patchouli, moss, musk and amber. “I wanted to create a fragrance in tune with the times,” said Almairac of the scent. “A fragrance which looks like a digital wave which is surfing on bright, contemporary and powerful notes.”

Rahme said HTTP, which was launched also to celebrate the brand’s 10th anniversary in September, is the first in a “digital collection,” which will receive two new scents a year and hopes to eventually adapt for different countries, in different languages .

Rahme, plans to implement a social media campaign, leveraging the brand’s 66,000 Facebook friends. “It’s Bond for the new world.”

Christian Dior The Impressionist

Christian Dior is set to make a mighty impression at its museum in Granville, France, this spring and summer. Scores of Impressionist paintings — on loan from the Musée d’Orsay, the Musée Marmottan Monet and other institutions — are making their way towards the historic home of the founding designer. They will be paired with more than 70 Dior dresses that echo the colors, silhouettes and femininity of works by Edgar Degas, Georges Seurat, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Berthe Morisot and other artists.

The showcase coincides with an Impressionist festival in the Normandy region of France, and will include a bespoke “perfume path” in the garden of the villa and a Rizzoli book by Florence Müller, a fashion historian and curator of the exhibition. It opens May 4 and runs through Sept. 22.

Norma Kamali Kicks Into High Gear

Norma Kamali has hit the accelerator on her year-old business, KamaliKulture, where everything in the line retails for under $100.

The line was inspired by Kamali’s three-year agreement designing Norma Kamali for Wal-Mart, which was both an in-store and Internet venture, that ended in spring 2011.

“It came about from my fantastic experience with Wal-Mart,” said Kamali, “I wanted to do it myself and saw the e-commerce potential. I wanted to add another level of sophistication.”

KamaliKulture includes sportswear, suitings, dresses, swimwear, footwear and eyewear, all with a modern point of view. The line is sold to such accounts as nordstrom.com, kohls.com, Zappos.com, Amazon.com and Opening Ceremony in New York, Los Angeles, London and Tokyo, as well as kamalikulture.com.

KamaliKulture expects to generate $10 million in sales this year, said the designer.

“We’re looking at expanding the categories. We’re talking about licensing and shapewear, as well as athletic sportswear. We’re looking at a strategic plan and want to take it global,” said Kamali. “It’s not fast fashion. It’s timeless style, but it’s a great value. The e-commerce opportunities are everywhere,” she added.

The collection is manufactured in such places as China and Guatemala, often in the same factories that Kamali used for her Wal-Mart line. The clothes are easy care, can be rolled up to travel and are machine washable. The collection runs the gamut from $25 long-sleeve crewneck T-shirts and $40 trenchcoats to $96 long-sleeve sweetheart draped dresses and $98 halter swimsuits with shirring in the front. The line also contains classic suiting, such as a navy blue pinstripe suit with a skirt for $44, a pant for $50 and a jacket for $78. Fabrics include polyester and Lycra spandex; nylon and Lycra; polyester, and rayon and spandex.

There are a variety of styles in each category. The jersey dresses include color-blocked sheath styles; striped maxidresses; sleeveless shirred-waist dresses and animal faux wrap designs, all under $100. Some of the dress designs are fairly basic but look good on people, said Kamali. “It’s for people who have style and can play with it, and for people who don’t have a clue and they put it on, and they can’t go wrong. They’re not so much basic, but they are timeless.” Sizes range from 0 to 18.

Kamali said she learned a great deal from her experience working with Wal-Mart. “They’re really good factories. It’s the design and how you construct it. We focus on our fabrications and we build a relationship with the factories. Wal-Mart factories are great factories. They make clothing for high-end and contemporary designers, too,” she explained.

KamaliKulture is being used as a platform for Kamali’s campaign to empower women and help them overcome self-esteem issues and to bring awareness to the negative long-term impact of objectification. She is offering a necklace designed with a silver long chain and dog tags that have sayings imprinted on them for empowerment and awareness. She is also launching eight fragrances with empowerment statements on the bottles. These are designed as a way to begin the conversation about women’s self-esteem issues.

Check out when Norma Kamali interviewed Second City Style’s Lauren Dimet Waters!

– Selicia A. Walker

Source: Women’s Wear Daily

See the Top Ten Summer 2016 Trends for Women Over 40

Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a Reply