Designers. Pomp & Circumstance for Pucci’s 60th Birthday. Second City Style Fashion Blog

Fountain of 30

May 25, 2007 • Fashion

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Nicole Kidman at Pucci Party

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Pucci Leite scarf, on sale for only $65 at Eluxury

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Pucci Plume Print Beach Hobo on sale for only $429 at Eluxury

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Pucci Flower Print scarf (not on sale 🙁 ) $260 at Eluxury

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Pucci Lava Print Silk Georgette Dress on sale $1,015 at Eluxury

Per usual, Suzy Menkes gives us some great IHT coverage and this time it’s the 60th anniversary party for Pucci. As she reports, stars and Italian aristocrats mingled to celebrate the Italian designer label’s contribution to the history of fashion.

Menkes reports, "My father had amazing passion for women – the body for him was
everything," said Laudomia Pucci, pointing to a 1970s bikini made
entirely from globular pearls. As the maestro’s daughter, and now image
director for the brand, she wore a vintage embroidered dress in quiet
colors, as did her mother, the Marchesa Cristina Pucci, in a slender
dress her husband had made for her 30 years before.

Both Nicole Kidman and Kylie Minogue are among the celebs who attended the event (and whose own collection for H&M is, how shall we say it, is clearly "inspired" by Pucci).

What next for the label?
Again, Menkes reports: For Laudomia Pucci, the challenge is to take the brand beyond the
prints, widely copied by fast fashion chains, and to go back to the
breadth of product she remembers when she first helped her father at
age 14. For the birthday, the original couture selling space was
recreated, the walls paneled with 400 different shades like a paint
chart, the name of each, from "celestial blue" to "Nile green," written
in medieval-style script on glass vitrines.

"But you will see there is no red – Daddy worked with fuchsia," said
Laudomia Pucci.

So even if the only Pucci you can muster is a pair of platforms or a
discreet cosmetic case, why not take a moment to nod your head to the
man who put fuschia on the fashion map.– Joanne Molina for Second City Style


Viva Pucci: The vivacious Italian brand celebrates its 60th birthday

            
            
            

            

               
               

FLORENCE:
Like psychedelic clouds, wildly patterned balloons floated over the
ancestral courtyard. Among the vivid swirls of pink, purple, turquoise
and lime – the graphic designs of Emilio Pucci – bounced feather-light
jersey dresses.

"Joyous – and cool," said the singer Kylie Minogue, who was wearing
a tiny sequined minidress and had the current Pucci designer, Matthew
Williamson, on her arm; while Elizabeth Hurley incited paparazzi
flashbulbs in a corseted dress by the former Pucci designer Christian
Lacroix.

For a 60th birthday, last weekend’s party to celebrate Pucci’s world
was as vivacious as those iconic prints. By the end of the evening, the
thick stone walls of the Renaissance palazzo resonated with dance
music, as guests from current celebrities to aristocratic Florentines –
Corsinis, Frescobaldis and Nicolinis – took to the dance floor or
viewed a small exhibition of terry-cloth beach cloaks and densely
embroidered beaded gowns.

Bona Frescobaldi, in a Pucci outfit like so many guests, reminisced
about sailing with Emilio on the Aegean Sea, when a jet-set friend swam
toward the boat singing praises to the designer and nobleman, who led
historic Florentine parades on a white horse.

Marie-Christine of Kent, with her husband, Prince Michael,
remembered the pile of silk shirts in her closet that the designer
would offer each season. And Hurley said that she first became aware of
the designer from vintage stores and from the Marilyn Monroe auction.

"My father had amazing passion for women – the body for him was
everything," said Laudomia Pucci, pointing to a 1970s bikini made
entirely from globular pearls. As the maestro’s daughter, and now image
director for the brand, she wore a vintage embroidered dress in quiet
colors, as did her mother, the Marchesa Cristina Pucci, in a slender
dress her husband had made for her 30 years before.

"It started yesterday – feeling emotional – before that we were
working so hard," said Cristina Pucci, who hosted the following day an
al fresco lunch at the family’s Tuscan villa, where the May sunshine
bathed the swimming pool in the perfect Mediterranean blue to match the
Vivara fragrance, relaunched with the refurbished brand.

Pucci has come a long way since the stylish Italian marquis, just
after the war that devastated Italy, made a hooded parka and skinny ski
pants for his girlfriend on the Swiss slopes. The boutique he
subsequently set up in Capri in 1950 was the crucible of the jet set,
offering to the heiress Gloria Guinness or to the voluptuous young
Sophia Loren a new sporty ease in cropped "Capri pants," cotton poplin
shirts and silk scarves. By the time Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy had
adopted the style and Marilyn Monroe had filled her closet with the
slinky jersey dresses, the "Emilio" logo was world famous and American
clients had dubbed the designer "the Prince of Prints."

Emilio Pucci died in 1992, and the return of Pucci to the limelight
came in 2000 with the purchase of 67 percent of the company by the
luxury group LVMH (Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton). The brand now has a
span of stores from Las Vegas to Tokyo, with two more boutiques, in
Bahrain and Yekaterinburg, Russia, slated for later this year.

Delphine Arnault, who said she was "representing her father" (the
LVMH chairman, Bernard Arnault), was at the heart of the weekend
events, alongside Pucci’s new general manager, Didier Drouet.

For Laudomia Pucci, the challenge is to take the brand beyond the
prints, widely copied by fast fashion chains, and to go back to the
breadth of product she remembers when she first helped her father at
age 14. For the birthday, the original couture selling space was
recreated, the walls paneled with 400 different shades like a paint
chart, the name of each, from "celestial blue" to "Nile green," written
in medieval-style script on glass vitrines.

"But you will see there is no red – Daddy worked with fuchsia," said
Laudomia Pucci, whose memories range from the workers’ Christmas tree
set up by a paternalist Italian family company to voyages to America –
to Atlanta, Los Angeles and New York – when her father was a ball of
energy and they subsisted on a carton of yogurt for lunch.

Williamson, with his eye on the vintage pieces on display in
cardboard packaging and on a floaty sea-blue-paneled dress, said that
his mission was to take the company from its heritage to the future.

"It’s a balance of two extremes – my job is first of all to respect
what has happened and the abundant inspiration of the archives," he
says. "But in order to be a contemporary fashion house, there is an
interesting dynamic. I am working at how far to push and pull." 

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