Luxury. It is Logical to Have a Passion for Fashion? Which Kind of Shopper Are You? Second City Style Fashion Blog

Fountain of 30

April 30, 2007 • Fashion

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Louis Vuitton and Cartier are brands many find aesthetically appealing and trustworthy.
As Sandra O’Loughlin reports for Brandweek that how we spend depends a lot on where we get the money to spend. Inherited or earned you people fall into two categories: the passionate spender who had grown up around luxury items and enjoys them for the sake of their aesthetic value OR the logical shopper who wants to make sure she wants to get lots of bang for the buck.

According to her research:
"The study was conducted last fall via the Internet among more than 1,300 people by American Express Publishing, New York, and Harrison Group, Waterbury, Conn. The implications for luxury brands are complex as they target the two types of consumers who comprise this affluent group: passion shoppers and logic shoppers.

Passion shoppers, who account for 40% of luxury shoppers, love the elegance of being in luxury environments and are willing to pay full retail for the experience. Logic shoppers have had their wealth a shorter period and did not grow up surrounded by the goods and services they can now afford.
"Logic shoppers are not necessarily buying a brand for the brand," said Cara David, AmEx svp-strategic insights, marketing and sales. "They may at the end of the day, through their due diligence ,conclude that a brand [is] something they should be purchasing. But they look for characteristics such as quality, craftsmanship, design, heritage—the real values of a product or service—before they think of the brand.


"Affluent Consumers Don’t Always ‘Brand’ Together"
By Sandra O’Loughlin
NEW YORK — According to W.C. Fields, "A rich man is nothing but a poor
man with money."
A new survey pretty much confirms that theory. According to the
inaugural Survey of Affluence and Wealth in America, nearly 80% of
people considered to be wealthy—defined here as those with
discretionary household incomes above $125,000—are products of the
middle class with solid middle-class values of education, hard work and
discipline. The study also found that 92% of these individuals acquired
their money the old-fashioned way: they earned it; just 8% inherited
their wealth. The study was conducted last fall via the Internet among
more than 1,300 people by American Express Publishing, New York, and
Harrison Group, Waterbury, Conn. The implications for luxury brands are
complex as they target the two types of consumers who comprise this
affluent group: passion shoppers and logic shoppers.
Passion shoppers, who account for 40% of luxury shoppers, love the
elegance of being in luxury environments and are willing to pay full
retail for the experience. Logic shoppers have had their wealth a
shorter period and did not grow up surrounded by the goods and services
they can now afford.
"Logic shoppers are not necessarily buying a brand for the brand," said
Cara David, AmEx svp-strategic insights, marketing and sales. "They may
at the end of the day, through their due diligence ,conclude that a
brand [is] something they should be purchasing. But they look for
characteristics such as quality, craftsmanship, design, heritage—the
real values of a product or service—before they think of the brand."
There are other differences. "A passion shopper will go into a store
like Saks and head straight for a luxury brand," said Jim Taylor, vice
chairman at Harrison Group. "A [logic] shopper [will] very carefully
research online for discount opportunities and make [a] decision using
a combination of value and what they learn about the brand."
In the case of a Louis Vuitton purse, for example, Taylor said passion
shoppers would respond to the brand and appreciate its craftsmanship
and design, but the logic group would require the brand to prove
itself. "It’s up to the brands to educate them as to why they should
pay a premium price," he said.
–Joanne Molina for Second City Style

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